The Mileseva Monastery is located six kilometers from Prijepolje on the Milesevci River. It was built in 1218 and 1219, and painted from 1222 to 1228. It was built by King Vladislav, the son of King Stefan the First-Crowned, and the grandson of Stefan Nemanja. King Vladislav built Mileseva as his grave church in which he was buried. The monastery was built in the Raska style, and is dedicated to the Ascension of the Lord.

In 1235, King Vladislav built another narthex to bury the body of his uncle Saint Sava, who, after a long journey through the Holy Land. Originally, Saint Sava was buried in Trnovo, Bulgaria, but Stefan Vladislav, through negotiations with the Bulgarian Tsar Ivan II Assen, took over the relics and buried them in Mileseva, where they rested until 1594, when Sinan-Pasha burned them in Vracar.

In 1235, King Vladislav built another narthex to bury the body of his uncle Saint Sava, who, after a long journey through the Holy Land. Originally, Saint Sava was buried in Trnovo, Bulgaria, but Stefan Vladislav, through negotiations with the Bulgarian Tsar Ivan II Assen, took over the relics and buried them in Mileseva, where they rested until 1594, when Sinan-Pasha burned them in Vracar.

In 1377, Stefan Tvrtko Kotromanić was crowned king of Bosnia and Serbia in the monastery, while in 1448 Stefan Vukčić Kosača took the title of “Duke of Saint Sava”, so his state, which at that time stretched from Milesevo, was called Herzegovina.

The preserved frescoes of Mileseva belong to the monumental works of Serbian painting of the Middle Ages. The most famous and magnificent fresco is the White Angel, a masterpiece of medieval painting. The fresco depicts the Angel of the Lord, dressed in a white chiton, sitting on a stone and carrying myrrh, showing the empty tomb of Christ, that is, the place of his Resurrection. The fresco is located on the south wall of the west aisle and was created in the 13th century. It was discovered in the 20th century, because there was another fresco painted in the 16th century over it.

The photograph of this fresco was the first image sent by satellite from Europe to America in 1958, and the first signal sent into space in 1962 contained photographs of the Great Wall of China and the White Angel.

In addition to the White Angel, there are other valuable frescoes “Removal from the Cross”, in which Mary Magdalene kisses the hand of the dead Christ. This fresco represents the most gracious scene of old Serbian art. On the north wall there is a halved composition “Birth” with realistically painted nannies, and there is a fragment of “Descent into Hell” with an angel and a devil.

The wealth of the Mileseva monastery, especially important to the Serbian people, are the portraits of our rulers. The portraits of Stefan Nemanja, Saint Sava, Stefan the First-Crowned, King Radoslav and the endowment of King Vladislav were painted. These frescoes, in addition to being beautiful, are of great documentary importance.

The wealth of the Mileseva monastery, especially important to the Serbian people, are the portraits of our rulers. The portraits of Stefan Nemanja, Saint Sava, Stefan the First-Crowned, King Radoslav and the endowment of King Vladislav were painted. These frescoes, in addition to being beautiful, are of great documentary importance.

Mileseva is known for the fact that Serbian literacy was kept in the monastery during the slavery under the Turks. The first book in enslaved Serbia was printed there. In the 16th century, monks bought a printing house in Venice, which they secretly trimmed on horses. From 1544 to 1557, as long as the printing house lasted, “Psalter”, “Prayer Book”, “Trebnik” and other books for church needs were printed.

Literature:

Mileseva Monastery, mileseva.com

Serbian Orthodox Church, Parish of St. Dimitrije Solunski, svetidimitrije.no

Portal serbia.com